Friday, August 23, 2013

Seals, Sundews and an Eagle at Lubec, Maine

Lubec is a small coastal village in Downeast yet "undiscovered" by the tourist throngs.  A couple of unpretentious restaurants, a couple of modest B&B's and the bridge to Campobello Island in Canada.  

At the entrance to the Bay of Fundy, with enormous tides and beautiful scenery, both in the village and along the bold coast of nearby West Quoddy Head State Park.

 Not yet "gentrified" and with a museum in  "the last working herring smokery!"
The main street is only one block long, with the town dock at the end.

A few galleries, some public art, and a really super public library. 


Maine's former independent governor, Angus King....newly elected independent Senator. 

Senator Angus King

Bald Eagle landing on the old herring smokehouse.  He was diving for fish.

Soaking wet after an unsuccessful dive....and apparently a bit "fussed up."

Looking across the harbor channel toward Canada's Campobello Island, FDR's summer home.

Roosevelt Campobello National Park

 Eastport, Maine in the distance....a couple of hours by car and 30 minutes by local ferry.
West Quoddy Head Light still guard the harbor entrance.  Now automated with the keeper's house a museum.

West Quoddy Head Lightkeepers Assoc

Looking out toward Grand Manan Island in Canada.

 The light uses one of the last remaining Fresnel Lenses in service.

 Looking eastward toward Canada's Grand Manan Island.
Quoddy Head State Park is a gem, with a picnic area and great hiking trails. 

We took a walk on the Bog Trail to see the Arctic Peat Bog and it's interesting flora.  Pitcher Plants and Sundews.

The Curious Bog

Some Indian Pipes (Monotropa uniflora)  along the trail.

Indian Pipe link

 Ferns, mosses and lichens.   If you want to more about these fascinating species, check out the programs at the Eagle Hill Institute in Steuben, Maine.
The bog is protected by a boardwalk....which also provides good closeup views of the plant life.

Baked Apple Berry Plant (Rubus chamaemorus).

Pitcher Plant blossom (Sarracenia purpurea).

Pitcher Plant link

You can actually see an insect floating inside this Pitcher Plant.  Charles Darwin first discovered carnivorous plants!  He is best known as a zoologist....but he also was an expert botanist.

Round-leaved Sundew  (Drosera rotundifolia).

What a great trip...seals, eagles, sundews and a picturesque coastal Maine village.  Looking over the mudflats of Passamaquoddy Bays as we head back to Wabi Sabi Farm in Harrington.

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